Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis is a life long condition that affects the brain and spinal cord. It usually diagnosed in people who are in their 20s and 30s.

It is an autoimmune condition, the immune system attacks the brain or spinal cord. In MS the immune system attacks the myelin sheath, a protective coating, around nerve cells. This results in messages transmitted along these nerves being disrupted, slowed and weakened.

Symptoms include:

  • Fatigue
  • Numbness
  • Balance and co-ordination problems
  • Muscle stiffness and spasms
  • Cognitive difficulties
  • Difficulty walking
  • Problems with vision

MS can occur in two ways:

  1. Relapsing-remitting MS

This occurs when symptoms progressively worsen in the span of a few days. The attacks may occur every few years. Although around half of the people with MS of this sort do go on to develop the second type within the next 15-20 years.

2. Primary progressive MS

In this type of MS there are no periods of remission, but instead symptoms progressively worsen.

Treatments include using steroids to treat relapses. Disease-modifying therapies can be used to reduce the frequency of relapses as well as specific treatments focused on alleviating symptoms.  At present, there is no cure for either type of MS and it will progressively get worse. However research is leading to strides in the development of new medication.

 

References:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg186

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Multiple-sclerosis/Pages/Introduction.aspx

https://www.mssociety.org.uk/what-is-ms

http://www.ms-uk.org/whatisms

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